Wardsend through an oil painting

A few weeks ago a few of us took a trip to Weston Park Museum as part of one of my other modules for my MA. Whilst in the museum we ventured into the Gallery where we stumbled upon several paintings of Hillsborough, a few of which featured Wardsend Cemetery from the 19th century.

I could not help but notice, and also appreciate, the different pictures of Wardsend portrayed in the images – such a contrast to the space we see now. The first painting, titled ‘Sheffield and the Valley of the Don’, was painted by Edward Price circa 1863. In the painting we can see a Wardsend Cemetery, surrounded by green fields and complete tranquillity. The original chapel is also in the picture. If I were to take a picture from the same location, say on my Iphone, we would now see Hillsborough College and the Owlerton Stadium, yet the cemetery still remains as part of this modern landscape – amazing.

The second painting, created by William John Stevenson, is an oil painting of the River Don at Wardsend. The painting is dated 1875, so almost ten years after Price’s painting, but still, the picture portrays the same tranquil demeanour. The scene displays a man looking over the River Don, with Wardsend in the distance.

Both images can be found by clicking on the artist’s respective name. Have a look and please feel free to share your thoughts on the paintings.

Edward Price

William John Stevenson

‘I Certainly Didn’t Expect To See That!’

It was Sunday the 9th of April, and the sun shone brightly as Sheffield’s temperature climbed into the 20s for one of the first times this year. It was a time for first ice creams of the year, sunbathing, a beer in a deckchair, and, of course, a day at Wardsend Cemetery.

Whilst much of the city was preparing itself for the half marathon, 37 of us made our way towards the sparkling and shimmering River Don, and Wardsend Cemetery. We could not be happier with the turnout, and want to personally thank everyone who came.

10-4-17 Pic 1

Image Credit: Howard Bayley, Facebook

The clean-up has made a big difference to the feel of the cemetery, and it is all thanks to the volunteers that Wardsend looks nice enough to match the weather!

Turnout was so high that we even ran out of images to pass around, so thank you everyone for sharing! From feedback we had on the day and on Facebook, it seems that everyone had a great day out, and hopefully learned a lot about the cemetery.

Not only was it wonderful to see so many people at our event, but it also meant that the donations we received were sizeable enough to cover our whole year’s insurance! So thank you everyone for your generosity!

If anyone wants to learn more (or perhaps recap) on Wardsend’s history, they can click this link

A final thank you again to everyone that came! And to anyone that wants to be more involved with the cemetery, you can join our Facebook page HERE

[Notice regarding images: The included image is taken from https://www.facebook.com/groups/wardsendcemeteryproject/, if you are included in this image and wish it to be removed, please email us at wardsend@gmail.com]

The Role of the Closed Cemetery

Hi. I’m Katy, another of the students studying Public Humanities at the University of Sheffield. I’ve also benefitted from the cemetery local to my parents’ house in Wiltshire since I was 15. Attached to the St. Denys the Minster, it provided me a place of refuge when my sister was watching rugby, somewhere to read poetry without interruption, and a place to think things through. It also bought me closer to my town when I discovered a WW1 grave, who’s occupant died 10 days before the Armistice was announced.

Why am I telling you all of this?

When we had our brief for the partnership with the Friends of Wardsend Cemetery, I was excited to find that we were focusing on a cemetery. This was a fantastic opportunity to be part of reclaiming the cemetery and turning it into a place of refuge, like my cemetery back home.

Many people consider my view of cemeteries as a place of refuge as a little bizarre, even a little gothic. However, in the Friends of Wardsend Cemetery, and the ‘Friends’ culture I hadn’t come across before moving to Sheffield, there is a different approach where the cemetery becomes a place of history, nature and community. From encouraging locals to get involved with clear up sessions through to working with heritage and environmental projects, the FoWC  is doing everything they can to bring Wardsend Cemetery back into the community.

So what will Wardsend Cemetery’s role be?

Obviously, a closed cemetery is not open for more burials. We are left with two possible roles. The local community can eventually abandon the cemetery and allow it to become overgrown and unused. This is what has happened to Wardsend. The other choice is to maintain the cemetery and turn it into an area that the community can enjoy and learn from. Essentially, to recreate the cemetery in the form of a museum, park and creative space. This is the route that the FoWC seem to be heading down.

In the renewed Wardsend Cemetery, the surrounding community has a space in which they can learn, create and relax. Who knows, maybe even a place for teenagers to seek refuge from sports-obsessed siblings.